Indication for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 is a vaccine indicated in females 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL 9 is indicated in males 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of anal cancer caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) does not eliminate the necessity for girls to continue to undergo recommended cervical cancer screening later in life. Recipients of GARDASIL 9 should not discontinue anal cancer screening if it has been recommended by a health care professional.

GARDASIL 9 has not been demonstrated to provide protection against diseases from vaccine HPV types to which a person has previously been exposed through sexual activity.

GARDASIL 9 is not a treatment for external genital lesions; cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers; or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VaIN), or anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN).

Not all vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers are caused by HPV, and GARDASIL 9 protects only against those vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

Vaccination with GARDASIL 9 may not result in protection in all vaccine recipients.

Select Safety Information for GARDASIL®9 9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant)

GARDASIL 9 is contraindicated in individuals with hypersensitivity, including severe allergic reactions to yeast, or after a previous dose of GARDASIL 9 or GARDASIL® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant].

Because vaccinees may develop syncope, sometimes resulting in falling with injury, observation for 15 minutes after administration is recommended. Syncope, sometimes associated with tonic-clonic movements and other seizure-like activity, has been reported following HPV vaccination. When syncope is associated with tonic-clonic movements, the activity is usually transient and typically responds to restoring cerebral perfusion.

Safety and effectiveness of GARDASIL 9 have not been established in pregnant women.

The most common (≥10%) local and systemic adverse reactions in females were injection-site pain, swelling, erythema, and headache. The most common (≥10%) local and systemic reactions in males were injection-site pain, swelling, and erythema.

The duration of immunity of GARDASIL 9 has not been established.

There was an increase in injection-site swelling reported at the injection site for GARDASIL 9 when administered concomitantly with Menactra and Adacel. The majority of injection-site swelling adverse experiences were reported as being mild to moderate in intensity.


Dosage and Administration for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 should be administered intramuscularly in the deltoid region of the upper arm or in the higher anterolateral area of the thigh.

  • For individuals 9 through 14 years of age, GARDASIL 9 can be administered using a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule. For the 2-dose schedule, the second dose should be administered 6–12 months after the first dose. If the second dose is administered less than 5 months after the first dose, a third dose should be given at least 4 months after the second dose. For the 3-dose schedule, GARDASIL 9 should be administered at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.
  • For individuals 15 through 26 years of age, GARDASIL 9 is administered using a 3-dose schedule at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.

Before administering GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant), please read the Prescribing Information. The Patient Information also is available.

1. de Sanjose S, Quint WGV, Alemany L, et al. Human papillomavirus genotype attribution in invasive cervical cancer: a retrospective cross-sectional worldwide study. Lancet Oncol. 2010;11(11):1048–1056.
2. de Sanjose S, Alemany L, Ordi J, et al. Worldwide human papillomavirus genotype attribution in over 2000 cases of intraepithelial and invasive lesions of the vulva. Eur J Cancer. 2013;49(16):3450–3461.
3. Alemany L, Saunier M, Tinoco L, et al. Large contribution of human papillomavirus in vaginal neoplastic lesions: a worldwide study in 597 samples. Eur J Cancer. 2014;50(16):2846–2854.
4. Alemany L, Saunier M, Alvarado-Cabrero I, et al. Human papillomavirus DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide. Int J Cancer. 2015;136(1):98–107.
5. Joura EA, Ault KA, Bosch FX, et al. Attribution of 12 high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes to infection and cervical disease. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014;23(10):1997–2008.
6. Garland SM, Steben M, Sings HL, et al. Natural history of genital warts: analysis of the placebo arm of 2 randomized phase III trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) vaccine. J Infect Dis. 2009;199(6):805–814.
7. Guan P, Howell-Jones R, Li N, et al. Human papillomavirus types in 115,789 HPV-positive women: a meta-analysis from cervical infection to cancer. Int J Cancer. 2012;131(10):2349–2359.
8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Vaccine storage and handling. In: Atkinson W, Hamborksy J, Stanton A, et al, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. 12th rev ed, 2nd printing. Washington, DC: Public Health Foundation; 2012:Appendix C.
9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Vaccine administration. In: Atkinson W, Hamborksy J, Stanton A, et al, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. 12th rev ed, 2nd printing. Washington, DC: Public Health Foundation; 2012:Appendix D.
10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Use of 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: updated HPV vaccination recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64(11):300–304.
11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Recommended immunization schedule for persons aged 0 through 18 years — United States, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/
schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf. Accessed June 3, 2016.
12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Human papillomavirus vaccination: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep. 2014;63(RR-5):1–30.
13. Finer LB, Philbin JM. Sexual initiation, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among young adolescents. Pediatrics. 2013;131(5):1–6.
14. Data available on request from Merck Professional Services-DAP, WP1-27, PO Box 4, West Point, PA 19486-0004. Please specify information package VACC-1163821-0000.
15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Addressing parents' top questions about HPV vaccine. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/who/teens/for-hcp-tipsheet-hpv.pdf. Updated January 2016. Accessed February 10, 2016.
16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HPV vaccine information for clinicians. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/
hcp/need-to-know.pdf. Updated November 2015.
Accessed February 10, 2016.
17. National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID). Call to action: HPV vaccination as a public health priority. http://www.nfid.org/homepage/additional-offerings/hpv-call-to-action.pdf. Published August 2014. Accessed February 11, 2016.
18. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Human papillomavirus vaccination coverage among adolescents, 2007–2013, and postlicensure vaccine safety monitoring, 2006–2014—United States. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014;63(29):614–624.
19. American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). Strong recommendation to vaccinate against HPV is key to boosting uptake. http://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20140212hpv-vaccltr.html. Published February 12, 2014. Accessed February 11, 2016.
20. Data available on request from Merck Professional Services-DAP, WP1-27, PO Box 4, West Point, PA 19486-0004. Please specify information package VACC-1096399-0000.
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Indication for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 is a vaccine indicated in females 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL 9 is indicated in males 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of anal cancer caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) does not eliminate the necessity for girls to continue to undergo recommended cervical cancer screening later in life. Recipients of GARDASIL 9 should not discontinue anal cancer screening if it has been recommended by a health care professional.

GARDASIL 9 has not been demonstrated to provide protection against diseases from vaccine HPV types to which a person has previously been exposed through sexual activity.

GARDASIL 9 is not a treatment for external genital lesions; cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers; or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VaIN), or anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN).

Not all vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers are caused by HPV, and GARDASIL 9 protects only against those vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

Vaccination with GARDASIL 9 may not result in protection in all vaccine recipients.

Select Safety Information for GARDASIL®9 9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant)

GARDASIL 9 is contraindicated in individuals with hypersensitivity, including severe allergic reactions to yeast, or after a previous dose of GARDASIL 9 or GARDASIL® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant].

Because vaccinees may develop syncope, sometimes resulting in falling with injury, observation for 15 minutes after administration is recommended. Syncope, sometimes associated with tonic-clonic movements and other seizure-like activity, has been reported following HPV vaccination. When syncope is associated with tonic-clonic movements, the activity is usually transient and typically responds to restoring cerebral perfusion.

Safety and effectiveness of GARDASIL 9 have not been established in pregnant women.

The most common (≥10%) local and systemic adverse reactions in females were injection-site pain, swelling, erythema, and headache. The most common (≥10%) local and systemic reactions in males were injection-site pain, swelling, and erythema.

The duration of immunity of GARDASIL 9 has not been established.

There was an increase in injection-site swelling reported at the injection site for GARDASIL 9 when administered concomitantly with Menactra and Adacel. The majority of injection-site swelling adverse experiences were reported as being mild to moderate in intensity.


Dosage and Administration for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 should be administered intramuscularly in the deltoid region of the upper arm or in the higher anterolateral area of the thigh.

  • For individuals 9 through 14 years of age, GARDASIL 9 can be administered using a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule. For the 2-dose schedule, the second dose should be administered 6–12 months after the first dose. If the second dose is administered less than 5 months after the first dose, a third dose should be given at least 4 months after the second dose. For the 3-dose schedule, GARDASIL 9 should be administered at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.
  • For individuals 15 through 26 years of age, GARDASIL 9 is administered using a 3-dose schedule at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.

Before administering GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant), please read the Prescribing Information. The Patient Information also is available.

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