References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National, regional, state, and selected local area and state vaccination coverage among adolescents aged 13–17 years—United States, 2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65(33):850–858.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 2015 Adolescent Varicella Vaccination Coverage Report. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/imz-managers/coverage/teenvaxview/data-reports/varicella/reports/2015.html.
    Accessed September 1, 2016.
  3. US Dept of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Healthy People 2020. Immunization and infectious diseases objectives: IID-11. Increase routine vaccination coverage levels for adolescents. https://www.healthypeople.gov/
    2020/topics-objectives/topic/immunization-and-infectious-diseases/objectives. Updated September 1, 2016.
    Accessed September 1, 2016.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prevention of varicella: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep. 2007;56(RR-4):1–40.
  5. Li S, Chan ISF, Matthews H, et al. Inverse relationship between six week postvaccination varicella antibody response to vaccine and likelihood of long term breakthrough infection. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2002;21(4):337–342.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Vaccine Storage and Handling Toolkit. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/storage/toolkit/storage-handling-toolkit.pdf.
    Published May 2014. Accessed September 1, 2016.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Recommended immunization schedules for persons aged 0 through 18 years—United States, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf. Effective January 1, 2016. Accessed September 1, 2016.
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