Indication for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 is a vaccine indicated in females 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL 9 is indicated in males 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of anal cancer caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) does not eliminate the necessity for womengirls to continue to undergo recommended cervical cancer screening later in life. Recipients of GARDASIL 9 should not discontinue anal cancer screening if it has been recommended by a health care professional.

GARDASIL 9 has not been demonstrated to provide protection against diseases from vaccine HPV types to which a person has previously been exposed through sexual activity.

GARDASIL 9 is not a treatment for external genital lesions; cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers; or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VaIN), or anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN).

Not all vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers are caused by HPV, and GARDASIL 9 protects only against those vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

Vaccination with GARDASIL 9 may not result in protection in all vaccine recipients.

Select Safety Information for GARDASIL®9 9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant)

GARDASIL 9 is contraindicated in individuals with hypersensitivity, including severe allergic reactions to yeast, or after a previous dose of GARDASIL 9 or GARDASIL® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant].

Because vaccinees may develop syncope, sometimes resulting in falling with injury, observation for 15 minutes after administration is recommended. Syncope, sometimes associated with tonic-clonic movements and other seizure-like activity, has been reported following HPV vaccination. When syncope is associated with tonic-clonic movements, the activity is usually transient and typically responds to restoring cerebral perfusion.

Safety and effectiveness of GARDASIL 9 have not been established in pregnant women.

The most common (≥10%) local and systemic adverse reactions in females were injection-site pain, swelling, erythema, and headache. The most common (≥10%) local and systemic reactions in males were injection-site pain, swelling, and erythema.

The duration of immunity of GARDASIL 9 has not been established.

There was an increase in injection-site swelling reported at the injection site for GARDASIL 9 when administered concomitantly with Menactra and Adacel. The majority of injection-site swelling adverse experiences were reported as being mild to moderate in intensity.


Dosage and Administration for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 should be administered intramuscularly in the deltoid region of the upper arm or in the higher anterolateral area of the thigh.

  • For individuals 9 through 14 years of age, GARDASIL 9 can be administered using a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule. For the 2-dose schedule, the second dose should be administered 6–12 months after the first dose. If the second dose is administered less than 5 months after the first dose, a third dose should be given at least 4 months after the second dose. For the 3-dose schedule, GARDASIL 9 should be administered at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.
  • For individuals 15 through 26 years of age, GARDASIL 9 is administered using a 3-dose schedule at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.

Before administering GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant), please read the Prescribing Information. The Patient Information also is available.

1. National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID). Call to action: HPV vaccination as a public health priority. http://www.nfid.org/publications/cta/hpv-call-to-action.pdf. Published August 2014. Accessed March 25, 2017.
2. de Sanjose S, Quint WGV, Alemany L, et al. Human papillomavirus genotype attribution in invasive cervical cancer: a retrospective cross-sectional worldwide study. Lancet Oncol. 2010;11(11):1048–1056.
3. de Sanjose S, Alemany L, Ordi J, et al. Worldwide human papillomavirus genotype attribution in over 2000 cases of intraepithelial and invasive lesions of the vulva. Eur J Cancer. 2013;49(16):3450–3461.
4. Alemany L, Saunier M, Tinoco L, et al. Large contribution of human papillomavirus in vaginal neoplastic lesions: a worldwide study in 597 samples. Eur J Cancer. 2014;50(16):2846–2854.
5. Alemany L, Saunier M, Alvarado-Cabrero I, et al. Human papillomavirus DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide. Int J Cancer. 2015;136(1):98–107.
6. Joura EA, Ault KA, Bosch FX, et al. Attribution of 12 high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes to infection and cervical disease. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014;23(10):1997–2008.
7. Garland SM, Steben M, Sings HL, et al. Natural history of genital warts: analysis of the placebo arm of 2 randomised phase III trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) vaccine. J Infect Dis. 2009;199(6):805–814.
8. Guan P, Howell-Jones R, Li N, et al. Human papillomavirus types in 115,789 HPV-positive women: a meta-analysis from cervical infection to cancer. Int J Cancer. 2012;131(10):2349–2359.
9. Data available on request from Merck Professional Services-DAP, WP1-27, PO Box 4, West Point, PA 19486-0004. Please specify information package VACC-1196399-0000.
10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Storage and handling. In: Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolf C, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. 13th ed. Washington, DC: Public Health Foundation; 2015:63–77.
11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Vaccine administration. In: Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolf C, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. 13th ed. Washington, DC: Public Health Foundation; 2015:79–106.
12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National, regional, state, and selected local area vaccination coverage among adolescents aged 13–17 years—United States, 2014. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/
preview/mmwrhtml/mm6429a3.htm. Accessed June 22, 2017.
13. Schuchat A. Recommending HPV vaccine successfully. http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/810030. Published September 3, 2013. Accessed May 1, 2017.
14. Petrosky E, Bocchini JA Jr, Hariri S, et al. Use of 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: updated HPV vaccination recommendations of the advisory committee on immunization practices. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64(11):300–304.
15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents aged 18 years or younger—United States, 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/
downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf. Published January 1, 2017. Accessed May 8, 2017.
16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Human papillomavirus vaccination: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep. 2014;63(RR-5):1–30.
17. Finer LB, Philbin JM. Sexual initiation, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among young adolescents. Pediatrics. 2013;131(5):1–6.
18. Data available on request from Merck Professional Services-DAP, WP1-27, PO Box 4, West Point, PA 19486-0004. Please specify information package VACC-1244939-0000.
19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Use of a 2-dose schedule for human papillomavirus vaccination—updated recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65(49):1405–1408.
20. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Human papillomavirus. In: Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe C, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. 13th ed. Washington DC: Public Health Foundation; 2015: 175–186.
21. American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). Strong recommendation to vaccinate against HPV is key to boosting uptake. http://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20140212hpv-vaccltr.html. Published February 12, 2014. Accessed May 7, 2017.
22. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Surveillance of Vaccination Coverage Among Adult Populations—United States, 2015. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/ss/ss6611a1.htm. Updated June 21, 2017. Accessed January 21, 2018.
23. McQuillan G, Kruszon-Moran D. Prevalence of HPV in Adults Aged 18–69: United States, 2011–2014. NCHS Data Brief. 2017;280:1–7.
24. Rahman S, Pierce Campbell CM, Rolisson DE, et al. Seroprevalence and associated factors of 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) types among men in the multinational HIM study. PLOS ONE. 2016(11):1–16.
25. Bahmanyar ER, Paavonen J, et al. Prevalence and risk factors for cervical HPV infection and abnormalities in young adult women at enrolment in the multinational PATRICIA trial. Gynecologic Oncology. 2012;(127):440–450.
26. American Cancer Society (ACS). American Cancer Society Recommendations for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Use. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/infectious-agents/hpv/acs-recommendations-for-hpv-vaccine-use.html. Revised July 19, 2016. Accessed February 14, 2018.
27. National Center for Health Statistics.1993. Section 1. In: Vital Statistics of the United States, 1989, Volume I – Natality. Public Health Service, Washington. U.S. Government Printing Office, 1–370.
28. Barnard M, George P, Perryman ML, et al. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine knowledge, attitudes, and uptake in college students: implications from the precaution adoption process model. PLOS ONE. 2017;12(8):1–9.
29. Rosenthal SL, Weiss TW, Zimet GD, et al. Predictors of HPV vaccine uptake among women aged 19–26: importance of a physician's recommendation. Vaccine. 2011;29(5):890–895.
30. Yanofsky VR, Patel RV, Goldenberg G. Genital warts: a comprehensive review. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2012;5(6):25–36.
31. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Link Between HPV and Cancer. https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/cancer.html. Updated December 16, 2016. Accessed February 14, 2018.
32. American Cancer Society (ACS). Cancer Facts & Figures 2018. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society; 2018.
33. Chesson HW, Ekwueme DU, Saraiya M. Estimates of the annual direct medical costs of the prevention and treatment of disease associated with human papillomavirus in the United States. Vaccine. 2012;42(30):6016–6019.

Reimbursement Information

Vaccines for Children Program

CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has approved funding under the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program for males and femalesa

aAdvisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Children Program. Vaccines to prevent human papillomavirus. Resolution No. 10/16-2. Adopted and effective October 19, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc/resolutions/2016-10-2-hpv.pdf. Accessed May 9, 2017.

CDC=Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CPT® and ICD-10-CM® Codes

Common reimbursement codes for GARDASIL 9

The commonly used codes below may apply to private payer reimbursement claims for vaccinations with GARDASIL 9.

Remember, plan coding requirements vary

Plan coding requirements may vary, so it is important to check with each plan as to plan-specific requirements. For claim submission procedures regarding government programs (eg, Medicaid), contact the appropriate program representative.

Indication for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 is a vaccine indicated in females 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL 9 is indicated in males 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of anal cancer caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) does not eliminate the necessity for womengirls to continue to undergo recommended cervical cancer screening later in life. Recipients of GARDASIL 9 should not discontinue anal cancer screening if it has been recommended by a health care professional.

GARDASIL 9 has not been demonstrated to provide protection against diseases from vaccine HPV types to which a person has previously been exposed through sexual activity.

GARDASIL 9 is not a treatment for external genital lesions; cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers; or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VaIN), or anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN).

Not all vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers are caused by HPV, and GARDASIL 9 protects only against those vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

Vaccination with GARDASIL 9 may not result in protection in all vaccine recipients.

Select Safety Information for GARDASIL®9 9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant)

GARDASIL 9 is contraindicated in individuals with hypersensitivity, including severe allergic reactions to yeast, or after a previous dose of GARDASIL 9 or GARDASIL® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant].

Because vaccinees may develop syncope, sometimes resulting in falling with injury, observation for 15 minutes after administration is recommended. Syncope, sometimes associated with tonic-clonic movements and other seizure-like activity, has been reported following HPV vaccination. When syncope is associated with tonic-clonic movements, the activity is usually transient and typically responds to restoring cerebral perfusion.

Safety and effectiveness of GARDASIL 9 have not been established in pregnant women.

The most common (≥10%) local and systemic adverse reactions in females were injection-site pain, swelling, erythema, and headache. The most common (≥10%) local and systemic reactions in males were injection-site pain, swelling, and erythema.

The duration of immunity of GARDASIL 9 has not been established.

There was an increase in injection-site swelling reported at the injection site for GARDASIL 9 when administered concomitantly with Menactra and Adacel. The majority of injection-site swelling adverse experiences were reported as being mild to moderate in intensity.


Dosage and Administration for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 should be administered intramuscularly in the deltoid region of the upper arm or in the higher anterolateral area of the thigh.

  • For individuals 9 through 14 years of age, GARDASIL 9 can be administered using a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule. For the 2-dose schedule, the second dose should be administered 6–12 months after the first dose. If the second dose is administered less than 5 months after the first dose, a third dose should be given at least 4 months after the second dose. For the 3-dose schedule, GARDASIL 9 should be administered at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.
  • For individuals 15 through 26 years of age, GARDASIL 9 is administered using a 3-dose schedule at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.

Before administering GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant), please read the Prescribing Information. The Patient Information also is available.

This resource is not intended to be conclusive or exhaustive as to what codes may be appropriate. You are solely responsible for determining the appropriate codes. Diagnosis codes should be selected only by a health care professional. Consult the ICD-10-CM 2016 manual to check the appropriateness of a particular code and for information on additional codes. Merck does not warrant or guarantee the timeliness or appropriateness of this information for your particular use and cannot guarantee that use of this information will result in reimbursement. Merck is not responsible for any action you take in billing for a Merck vaccine.

CPT codes are used for billing professional services. Note that CPT 90472 (listed above) is expected to apply when more than 1 vaccine is administered the same day.

ICD-10-CM codes may be utilized or mandated by payers to describe the viral disease for which the prophylactic vaccination is administered. There is not currently an ICD-10-CM code specific to the HPV vaccine. (This resource reflects information available to Merck as of February 2018.)

For additional information regarding CPT product and administration codes concerning GARDASIL 9, go to the Merck Vaccine Reimbursement Support Center through http://www.vaccinesupportservices.com.

CPT=Current Procedural Terminology. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

CPT is a registered trademark of the American Medical Association.

ICD-10-CM=International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification.

VACC-1246170-0000 05/18
CPT Code for Product
90651
Human papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant, 3-dose schedule, for intramuscular use
CPT Codes for Vaccine Administration
90471
Immunization administration (includes percutaneous, intradermal, subcutaneous, or intramuscular injections); one vaccine (single or combination vaccine/toxoid)
90472
Each additional vaccine (single or combination vaccine/toxoid) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure) (Use 90472 in conjunction with 90471 or 90473)
ICD-10-CM Code
Z23
Effective for dates of service on or after October 1, 2015 Encounter for Immunization

Indication for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 is a vaccine indicated in females 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL 9 is indicated in males 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of anal cancer caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58; and genital warts caused by HPV Types 6 and 11.

GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) does not eliminate the necessity for girls to continue to undergo recommended cervical cancer screening later in life. Recipients of GARDASIL 9 should not discontinue anal cancer screening if it has been recommended by a health care professional.

GARDASIL 9 has not been demonstrated to provide protection against diseases from vaccine HPV types to which a person has previously been exposed through sexual activity.

GARDASIL 9 is not a treatment for external genital lesions; cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers; or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VaIN), or anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN).

Not all vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers are caused by HPV, and GARDASIL 9 protects only against those vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by HPV Types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

Vaccination with GARDASIL 9 may not result in protection in all vaccine recipients.

Select Safety Information for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 is contraindicated in individuals with hypersensitivity, including severe allergic reactions to yeast, or after a previous dose of GARDASIL 9 or GARDASIL® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant].

Because vaccinees may develop syncope, sometimes resulting in falling with injury, observation for 15 minutes after administration is recommended. Syncope, sometimes associated with tonic-clonic movements and other seizure-like activity, has been reported following HPV vaccination. When syncope is associated with tonic-clonic movements, the activity is usually transient and typically responds to restoring cerebral perfusion.

Safety and effectiveness of GARDASIL 9 have not been established in pregnant women.

The most common (≥10%) local and systemic adverse reactions in females were injection-site pain, swelling, erythema, and headache. The most common (≥10%) local and systemic reactions in males were injection-site pain, swelling, and erythema.

The duration of immunity of GARDASIL 9 has not been established.

Dosage and Administration for GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 should be administered intramuscularly in the deltoid region of the upper arm or in the higher anterolateral area of the thigh.

  • For individuals 9 through 14 years of age, GARDASIL 9 can be administered using a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule. For the 2-dose schedule, the second dose should be administered 6–12 months after the first dose. If the second dose is administered less than 5 months after the first dose, a third dose should be given at least 4 months after the second dose. For the 3-dose schedule, GARDASIL 9 should be administered at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.
  • For individuals 15 through 26 years of age, GARDASIL 9 is administered using a 3-dose schedule at 0, 2 months, and 6 months.

Before administering GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant), please read the Prescribing Information. The Patient Information also is available.

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