Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Related Diseases

How widespread is HPV?

In the United States, the equivalent of
~19,000 new HPV infections
occur in teens and young adults every day.1,a

Every year there are ~14 million new HPV
infections
nationwide.1

About 50% of them are in 15- to 24-year-olds.1

  1. a15- to 24-year-olds.

For most people, HPV clears on its own. But, for others who don’t clear the virus, it could cause certain cancers and other diseases.1

How is HPV acquired and transmitted?

HPV is most commonly acquired and transmitted through sexual intercourse. However, it can be spread through many types of genital contact—intercourse is not necessary. Individuals can acquire HPV from others who are infected but who don’t have visible disease or lesions.1

What are the potential outcomes and incidence rates of HPV-related diseases?

For most people, HPV clears on its own. But, for others who don’t clear the virus, it could cause certain cancers and diseases later in life.1

It is estimated that in the United States, there are 10,900 new cases of cervical cancer every year that are caused by HPV.2,b

bEstimate represents cervical cancer cases caused by all oncogenic HPV types.

HPV-related cancers can take years, even decades to develop.3

Not all cervical cancer cases are caused by HPV.2

ref1

Reference

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Human papillomavirus. In: Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe C, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. 13th ed. Washington DC: Public Health Foundation; 2015:175-186.
ref2

Reference

  1. Senkomago V, Henley J, Thomas CC, et al. Human papillomavirus—attributable cancers — United States, 2012–2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2019;68(33):724-728.
ref3

Reference

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 6 types of cancer caused by HPV. https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/cancer.html. Published April 29, 2019. Accessed February 19, 2020.

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